THE MARKS LEFT BY ART (part 2)

THE MARKS LEFT BY ART part 2

THE MARKS LEFT BY ART part 2

The marks left by art part two and a photo taken by Maria Slovakova earlier today when she came to deliver her piece of work for the Vinyl show at Cultivate… This is where I’ve been busy painting vinyl, my ‘studio’ is the pavement outside and I shall leave my mark on Vyner Street when we finally retreat from the scene of the crime…

Do rather like the idea of lots of hand painted pieces of reasonably priced vinyl…

FRIDAY 13th VINYL PAINTING

FRIDAY 13th VINYL PAINTING

Today was mostly spent painting vinyl ready from Vinyl. Vinyl opens on Thursday evening at Cultivate, and today, while people came in to see the Fool’s Gold show, I spent the day mostly out front on the pavement on the corner painting – “real street artist” said the German tourist talking lots of photos, “not really” said I, “but you are painting on the street so you are” he insisted… lots of good conversation at the gallery today, couple of sales as well, a sale or two is always nice, “I like you’re affordable art ethic” said the man on his bike who rode down specially and spent an hour or so talking about art and galleries and how it all works… Vyner Street does need a shake up and that is going to have to come soon, for now we’re enjoying the vinyl and getting ready to fill the gallery with lots of very affordable recycled (upcycled?) vinyl…
FRIDAY 13th, outside painting

FRIDAY 13th, outside painting

Do rather like the idea of lots of reasonably priced pieces of hand painted pieces of vinyl… all part of the continuing what price art exploration… fifty pieces of vinyl, hand painted and for sale at no more that £20 a piece, probably less in most cases…

“Found pink chairs – Gallery Piece” Sean Worrall, April 2012.

Found pink chairs, April 7th 2012

Found pink chairs, April 7th 2012

Saw something pink in the distance on Mowlem Street, the street just off Vyner Street, the two streets that meet on the corner that Cultivate stands on, the art re-up corner directly over from the Victory pub.   Saw something pink, and everything must be investigated, might have been something worth photographing for that forthcoming show of photographs of all that art people never look at on their way to the galleries, a series of photographs I’ve been taking (and putting up on line over at Facebook) since September of last year and Cultivate’s opening.

Saw something pink in the distance on Mowlem Street, turned out to be two rather vividly hand-painted broken chairs, a broken dining room table with some half formed graff on one of the leaves and another broken coffee table that looked far more interesting in terms of the art and the (French) marks on the top..

Found coffee table top

Found coffee table top

Took the photos of the things I saw in the distance, then took the broek table top back to the gallery, thinking it would be something to paint on.  Locked up the doors after a long Friday in the gallery, and went home…

Those shocking pink chairs were on my mind though. Damn, I really shouldn’t have left them there on the street, they really were rather beautiful in their distress unwanted broken down state.  Headed back down there this morning for a Saturday at the gallery and, yes, there they were, the pink blur in the distance was still there. Still left where they were last night, still there, broken chairs, unwanted on the street… Took them both back to the gallery and left them sitting outside the front door on the pavement for a bit. Sitting outside the front door, I just enjoyed looking at them for a bit, enjoying them.  No one else did, people walked straight past, straight in through the gallery door – they never ever do look at the art on the street (bet they take great note of the photographs of the art on the street when we finally get around to putting the photographs of the art they never look at in to frames and up on the gallery walls, present them as art to be looked at…).

The bones of those unloved pink chairs outside the front door

The bones of those unloved pink chairs outside the front door

So there the chairs were, with their “NTGM Prod” black marker-pen tag on the front and their pink legs all falling apart, the unwanted bones of broken chairs, joints broken, chairs that have already been through a couple of life-cycles by the looks of things.

And there the broken pink chairs stayed, out on the street, out front of the gallery, ignored on the street as the people came in to see the art in the gallery…. And the more I looked at them the more I liked them, the more I liked their shape, the more I liked their colour, their dirt, their tags, the masking tape that clearly would never hold them together. I considered spending the day drawing them (I still might). Why doesn’t anyone else look at them? Are they not art? When are a couple of broken chair just broken chairs? When do two broken vividly-painted pink chairs stacked on top of each other and placed in an art gallery become art?

"Found pink chairs - Gallery Piece"  Sean Worrall, April 2012  (£500).

"Found pink chairs - Gallery Piece" Sean Worrall, April 2012 (£500).

Not that “When do two broken vividly-painted pink chairs stacked on top of each other and placed in an art gallery become art?” is a particularly new question.   No, not a new question, but it did deserved to be asked today, well I wanted to ask it.   So they were carefully placed on top of each other in the middle of the gallery floor.  And people started looking at them, circling around them, admiring them, asking who’s work they were, debating them.  I resisted joining in most of the debate, more interesting to ‘invisibly’ listen.   I told one man the piece had been placed there by Sean Worrall, he wrote the name down in his note book, checked the spelling and took several photos.

And so the ‘piece’ installed in the gallery became one of the talked about pieces in the Fool’s Gold group show today.  I didn’t add any marks of my own for a couple of hours, but then those found silver high heeled shoes were still on the gallery floor just beyond the found chair piece, and those shoes were saying the chair piece needed marks like the marks they had. Several people have asked about buying the shows, they’re not for sale, I don’t think they’re for sale? I will give the silver painted shoes away to the first person who can actually get their foot in to one.   So I eventually made a couple of marks on the pink chair gallery piece and left them there for the rest of the Saturday afternoon for people to look at, photograph and talk about…

“Definitely just chairs, right?” said the guy from the gallery around the corner… Yes, just a couple of broken chairs I saw in the distance on the street…

“Found pink chairs – Gallery Piece” Sean Worrall, April 2012.

Work in progress, getting ready for the forthcoming vinyl show…

NEW VINYL PAINTING IN PROGRESS - April 2012

NEW VINYL PAINTING IN PROGRESS - April 2012

Work in progress, getting ready for the forthcoming vinyl show and another set of recycled record drops on the street (or is the word upcycle now?)

Beatles, Revolution, April 2012 (unfinished)

Beatles, Revolution, April 2012 (unfinished)

Twp old albums and a Beatles record, way past being playable, 10p in the charity shop and half way to being ready for the show in two weeks and a Saturday spent inside and outside the gallery… Three of several pieces that are still work in progress.

…and asked me how I felt things were going at Cultivate

Someone just reminded me of this interview from a few months back, an interview that ran on the FAD magazine website, and while reminding me, that someone commented on how it all still seemed positive and goog and exciting down Vyner Street and asked me how I felt things were going at Cultivate.

CROWDS OUTSIDE CULTIVATE

CROWDS OUTSIDE CULTIVATE

Well yes it does mostly still feel good and exciting ans positive and all those things and from a working artist point of view it is proving to be very interesting. interesting to work on it from the gallery side and to have to deal with the harsh reality of it all, the business side, survival and such, it is also proving very interesting to watch and observe, at close quarter on a day by day basis, how all the other galleries in the street work (or indeed don’t work) in terms of the artists they show or represent It would be very easy to become very cynical about some of the things we see going on in this so called leading East London art street (I do wish a few more of them would actually open their doors and look like they’d at least like to invite the public in to see what they have a little more). We were one of only three galleries of the twenty or so that exist in the street to be open this weekend, some just don’t seem to be that committed, one of those that were open choose to hide behind a locked door and a not very obvious bell you need to ring to get in, I’m forever sending people back down there and saying yes, Wilkinson is there and open, they jsut don’t have any signs that indicate that they are there and open 9I don’t know maybe they do it on purpose?) So of the spaces seem to not bother about anything other than First Thursday, some are only open when artists can afford the rent and hire then, some just never open, just sit there locked with art inside, strange street… Still, we had a great weekend, lots of people, good reaction, debate, conversation and indeed healthy sales (like it or not sales do matter, we artists need to eat and buy new brushes, we galleries need to pay the rent), it was another enjoyable weekend and we’re really enjoying sharing the current show with people and I do get the feeling the street will wake up a little in April…

The open door

The open door

One of my favourite people this weekend was an sweet old guy who comes in most weeks and spends ages quietly looking at each and every piece, he went in to Wilkinson for the first time this Sunday (so many local people say they never go in to any of the other galleries in the street). He came back full of enthusiasm for the work of MAKIKO KUDO and confessed he really didn’t like Japanese people because of what happened to him in the war, but the beauty of the show meant he could finally think good things about the people of Japan.. Don’t know what happened to him but he did seem rather emotional. I was also rather pleased to have the gang of kids who had been watching me paint the daffodil last week, come back to see the show and ask lots of questions and ask me for a note for their art teacher because the teched would not believe they went to an art gallery at the weekend. I enjoy being on that corner talking to everyone (well besides the art snob with the sunglasses on his head who stood outside and declared to his friends, before any of them had been in, that it was never worth going in to the smaller galleries)

Anyway, yes, on the whole the Cultivate experience is still, on the whole a good experience, enjoying sharing other people’s art with people and showing out own art on our own terms without having to deal with some of the crap we see and hear from the other galleries…